Frustrations in life of law

Frustrations abound in life and law.

  • The train is either agonizingly delayed, at the expense of my monthly meeting — obsessively gaveled to order on time — or leaves with infuriating promptness when I am held up, forcing me to acknowledge I can no longer cover the five-minute dash to the station in less than seven minutes.

Baseball faces formidable 2018 lineup of litigation

The past four spring training columns have each covered the progress of a class-action lawsuit in which minor league players sought to obtain what Major League Baseball, supreme ruler of the minor leagues, was unwilling to provide: a living wage. Many minor leaguers earn less than $7,500 a year, some less than $3,000, but barring action by the Supreme Court, their suit appears concluded.

Ghost of Steinbeck haunts decades of litigation over his works

So in our pride we ordered for breakfast an omelet, toast and coffee and what has just arrived is a tomato salad with onions, a dish of pickles, a big slice of watermelon and two bottles of cream soda. —John Steinbeck

When John Steinbeck penned, in his 1952 novel “East of Eden,” that “I believe there are monsters born in the world to human parents,” few readers could have envisioned that he might someday become one of those parents.

How to Make the Case for a Smaller Law Firm to Your Board

The list of reasons why small law firms offer big advantages is well known—this is especially true for businesses that are midsized or emerging. But here's a quick review. With a smaller law firm, seasoned attorneys are the norm, rather than the associates who typically handle day-to-day business for the big law firms.

Wedding bells fail to ring, but way found around ‘unambiguous’ contract

Bride-to-be Jennifer Corona contracted with The Architects Golf Club in May 2012 to host her wedding reception.  The terms were simple enough. 

The club agreed to make available its catering hall in Lopatcong, New Jersey, and to provide the food and beverages.  Corona agreed to pay a pre-set amount, and made three deposit payments pursuant to the contract. 

The wedding was originally to take place in July 2013.  Alas, and perhaps with the heavenly thoughts of Dirty Harry’s alter ego on her mind, Corona postponed it by one year.  The club accommodated the change. 

Seventh Circuit Rules that Title VII Prohibits Sexual Orientation Discrimination in the Workplace

On Tuesday, April 4, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit issued a landmark decision, holding that federal discrimination law prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.  In an 8 - 3 decision in Hively v. Ivy Tech Community ollege, the Seventh Circuit became the first federal court of appeals to hold that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Minor Leaguers have Ninth Inning Rally, have Chance for Minimum Wage

Philadelphia Phillies prospect Dylan Cozens belted 40 home runs in 2016 to lead all minor leaguers. At season’s end, Cozens accepted Minor League Baseball’s Joe Bauman Home Run Award, and the $8,000 check that came with it ($200 for each round-tripper) by half-joking that the prize was more than he had earned all season with the AA League’s Reading Fightin Phils.

Federal Judge Rejects U.S. Department of Labor's New Regulation to Expand Employee Eligibility for Overtime Pay

Employers throughout the country had a little extra to be thankful for this past Thanksgiving.  On Tuesday, a federal district court issued a nationwide injunction preventing the U.S. Department of Labor (the "DOL") from implementing a new federal regulation designed to expand the number of employees eligible for overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The Illinois Freedom to Work Act: New Illinois Law Outlaws Non-Compete Agreements With Low-Wage Employees

Illinois law governing restrictive covenants in employment agreements has undergone a number of changes in the past few years.  The latest development is the Illinois Freedom to Work Act, which prohibits employers from entering into non-compete agreements with low-wage employees.