Adam J. Glazer

Ex-city alderman uses clever logic in effort to avoid prison

Former Chicago Ald. Willie Cochran will be sentenced next week.

After admitting helping himself to the proceeds of a donors’ fund earmarked for ward activities, Cochran asked the court for the proverbial wrist slap (six months’ home confinement), rather than the 12 to 18 months in prison indicated under federal sentencing guidelines.

Holiday parties are fraught with peril; inviting HR doesn't help

For reasons I don’t understand, this year’s holiday party has been entrusted to me.

Wait, on second thought, I do understand. I’m in charge of the holiday party by default. No one else wanted to do it. And the party’s decision-making has been rife with conflict.

Good facts and good judge support rep’s claim for breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing

… When a principal terminates a contract not for any legitimate or neutral reason, but to shed the rep before a sale closes and commissions become due, raising a bad faith claim, which may make additional damages available, should at least be explored.

Frustrations in life of law

Frustrations abound in life and law.

  • The train is either agonizingly delayed, at the expense of my monthly meeting — obsessively gaveled to order on time — or leaves with infuriating promptness when I am held up, forcing me to acknowledge I can no longer cover the five-minute dash to the station in less than seven minutes.

Baseball faces formidable 2018 lineup of litigation

The past four spring training columns have each covered the progress of a class-action lawsuit in which minor league players sought to obtain what Major League Baseball, supreme ruler of the minor leagues, was unwilling to provide: a living wage. Many minor leaguers earn less than $7,500 a year, some less than $3,000, but barring action by the Supreme Court, their suit appears concluded.

Ghost of Steinbeck haunts decades of litigation over his works

So in our pride we ordered for breakfast an omelet, toast and coffee and what has just arrived is a tomato salad with onions, a dish of pickles, a big slice of watermelon and two bottles of cream soda. —John Steinbeck

When John Steinbeck penned, in his 1952 novel “East of Eden,” that “I believe there are monsters born in the world to human parents,” few readers could have envisioned that he might someday become one of those parents.

From Toothless to Tigers: A Look at State Sales Rep Statutes

“Hey, Adam,” begins many an incoming office call, “the principal who owes me back commissions didn’t remember that our contract says Tennessee law (or Utah, Colorado, New Jersey, Georgia, etc.) applies. I can get triple commissions, right?”

“Well,” begins the formal, technical response to many such calls, while stalling for time. Then, the very first legal phrase taught in law school is invoked: “That depends.”

Many independent reps are familiar with sales rep protection statutes. These state laws are generally intended to help level the playing field with their principals when a commission dispute arises.

Determined Sales Rep Recovers Commissions Plus Exemplary Damages from Bullheaded Principal

Most reps hunt for some valuable takeaways when a relationship with a principal ends badly. No hard searching was necessary after a recently completed rep-principal trial in Chicago, where the final count of useful "lessons learned" proved nearly as abundant as the sales rep's recovery.